Concurrent Proceedings

Failed PTAB Bill Reemerges For a 6th Time

Yesterday, U.S. Senators Chris Coons (D-Del.),Thom Tillis(R-N.C.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), and Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) introduced the Promoting and Respecting Economically Vital American Innovation Leadership (PREVAIL) Act (here). Also yesterday, some of the very same senators introduced the Patent Eligibility Restoration Act of 2023

The co-introduction of these bills suggests a plan to drive compromise on patent eligibility.Continue Reading New PTAB Bill to Drive 101 Compromise?

CLE Provided

This coming Thursday at 12PM (EST), IPWatchdog will host the free webinar entitled: PTAB Rules: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly. The webinar will cover the recent Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), preview stakeholder reactions, Congressional concerns, and discuss the most likely outcomes. Register (here)

With comments due from

Unnecessarily Ambitious

Late last week the USPTO issued an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) that floated numerous rule proposals and requests for feedback — too numerous. Proposals addressing current 314(a) and 325(d) practices were not only expected, but long overdue. While these expected proposals were included in the sprawling Notice, the rule-making process will undoubtedly be bogged down by the remaining collection of controversial ideas and administrative over-reach.

Keep in mind that 314(a) Fintiv practices could soon be struck down as improper circumvention of APA rule-making. Stalling the issuance of those rules for at least another 12-18 months – if not longer – seems like a bad idea. My guess is political pressure from outside the agency led to the laundry list of additional proposals. Especially as they relate to for-profit entities in the wake of the Open Sky debacle.

Regardless, of how or why the expansive ANPRM came to be, I’ll walk through each proposal/idea in detail below (ANPRM here)Continue Reading PTAB Rule Ideas – The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly

Examination Quality vs Speed

The USPTO has had an accelerated examination program known as “Track-1” since 2011. The program allows patent applicants to advance a patent application out-of-turn such that a determination can be made within 12 moths of filing. That is, like a Lightning Lane of sorts (for you Disney fans) to skip the typical wait times for patent examination. In this way the program is said to be designed to foster “faster innovation.”

In theory, it is a great idea. If you are a start-up, for example, and need to get your claims allowed quickly for business reasons. Paying a fee for the expedited attention, agreeing not to extend filing dates of responses, and limiting the number of claims, is a fair compromise.

But, if patent examiners are rushed to judgement to meet internal deadlines, and do so without the most relevant information, the USPTO is doing the public a disservice. Recent trends also suggest that examiners may be moving these cases to allowance to get time-sensitive work off of their dockets.Continue Reading The PTO Has a Track-One Filing Problem

Senators Excoriate Perceived WDTX Venue Abuses

Back in September, I previewed the PTAB reform discussions that eventually issued as the Restoring the America Invents Act.  The Act, clearly a rebuke of the Iancu administration’s changes to AIA trial practices, also included a provision encouraging district court stays in view of PTAB challenges. The unspoken concern behind the stay provision is the growth of patent litigation in the WDTX . If there was any doubt about that rationale, the Senate Judiciary has just explicitly put WDTX’s Judge Albright directly in its cross-hairs.
Continue Reading Senate Judiciary Characterizes WDTX Practices as Unseemly & Inappropriate

Abusive Reexam Relief

Late last month, in In re Vivint, Inc., the Federal Circuit tackled the question of whether a post-issuance review proceeding (in this case, ex parte reexamination (“EPR”)) was available to a challenger that repeatedly filed another post-issuance review proceeding (in this case, inter partes review (“IPR”)) to forward the very same argument. The court held that, while the EPR request had shown substantial new questions of patentability, “the Patent Office abused its discretion and acted arbitrarily and capriciously under § 325(d).” As such the court vacated the decision and remanded to the Patent Office (“PTO”) with instructions to dismiss.

But, don’t expect this decision to be much more than a corner case.
Continue Reading Reexam After Failed IPR?

Do Private Arbitration Agreements Undermine Public Policy?

With Congress considering “encouraging” stays of patent litigation pending concurrent PTAB review, licensors may begin to look to contractual  mechanisms to avoid a PTAB filing altogether.  The strategy is not unprecedented, and may provide a way for district courts to enjoin the agency from moving forward with AIA trials.

But, should private agreements thwart mechanisms designed to remove improvidently granted patent monopolies?
Continue Reading Avoiding the PTAB by Private Agreement?

October Webinar to Debrief on Leahy Bill

Senator Patrick Leahy (D) VT and Senator John Cornyn (R) TX have jointly drafted a new bill entitled the “Restoring the America Invents Act.” The Bill proposes to roll-back recent directives and policies of former USPTO Director Iancu, most notably discretionary denials of AIA trial proceedings in view

Bill Released – Iancu Era Rebuked

Well, the wait was not that long after all.  Senator Leahy -VT (D) (with co-sponsor Senator Cornyn – Tx (R)) has today released the draft bill entitled “Restoring the America Invents Act.”  The bill includes most of what I expected, with a handful of additional tweaks.

Below is a brief overview of all of the proposed changes.
Continue Reading Restoring the America Invents Act – What You Need to Know

CAFC Cautions Against IPR Stay Considerations in Venue Dispute

A mandamus is considered an extraordinary remedy — especially in the venue context where district courts are accorded broad discretion.  Nevertheless, where a motion to transfer presents an indisputable right, mandamus is proper. Recently, the Federal Circuit has been uncharacteristically outspoken that the WDTX is doing it wrong.

The most recent WDTX mandamus on this issue, while unsuccessful, found the Federal Circuit once again pointing out improper analysis.
Continue Reading Judge Albright Faulted for Considering IPR Stay Likelihood in NDCA